Wild Space Explorers

    klawxx

    Product Manager - Roden Shipyards
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    It’s not complicated at all. Just a button feeding into a chain of delay blocks. Each delay block is connected to a light.
    Thanks for the reply.
    What you are describing is actually what I did.

    What I'm having a hard time figuring out (And I think you achieved) is to light just one block at a time, instead of the "worm effect... Maybe it will be easier if I just show to you:

     
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    Thanks for the reply.
    What you are describing is actually what I did.

    What I'm having a hard time figuring out (And I think you achieved) is to light just one block at a time, instead of the "worm effect... Maybe it will be easier if I just show to you:
    The only difference is I use a button instead of an activator block because I only need to fire it once. I assume you want to continue looping this until you decide to turn it on or off.

    The say I would do that:


    - Activator (to turn blinky lights on/off)

    - Connect it to an AND block and a button

    - Button connects to the string of delay blocks (first block)

    - AND block connects to the string of delay blocks (first block)

    - Last delay block connects to the AND block

    So when you turn on the Activator this will trigger the button to start the single pulse in the delay chain.

    When it reaches the last block the AND block will trigger and start the whole chain all over again.
     
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    klawxx

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    The only difference is I use a button instead of an activator block because I only need to fire it once. I assume you want to continue looping this until you decide to turn it on or off.

    The say I would do that:


    - Activator (to turn blinky lights on/off)

    - Connect it to an AND block and a button

    - Button connects to the string of delay blocks (first block)

    - AND block connects to the string of delay blocks (first block)

    - Last delay block connects to the AND block

    So when you turn on the Activator this will trigger the button to start the single pulse in the delay chain.
    When it reaches the last block the AND block will trigger and start the whole chain all over again.
    So It was basically just adding a button between the delay and the light. Damn, why I couldn't see this before!
    Thanks a lot for taking your time to explain this to me.

    Kind Regards,
    - Klawxx
     
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    Something strange is happening in the far reaches of Wild Space. An unidentified object has been detected.

    I’ve dispatched some recon forces to investigate.
    The one thing that struck me as odd is how when you reconstructed the ship into its more asymmetrical form, you placed the docking port on the starboard side. If I'm not mistaken, there is a historical reason why ships' sides are named the way they are–when the ancients placed their ships in a dock, the docking port defined the "port" side, while the starboard side was the one facing the stars... at least that's what our historians keep telling me ;)

    Even in your modern day shipyard, you instinctively followed that age-old tradition, yet counterintuitively decided to place the port on the "wrong" side. Might be something to consider.

    Not entirely sold on the lower rear "wingy bits", they look a bit out of place IMO, but great job overall, as usual.

    Props to the 809M7, whoever they are... :D
     
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    The one thing that struck me as odd is how when you reconstructed the ship into its more asymmetrical form, you placed the docking port on the starboard side. If I'm not mistaken, there is a historical reason why ships' sides are named the way they are–when the ancients placed their ships in a dock, the docking port defined the "port" side, while the starboard side was the one facing the stars... at least that's what our historians keep telling me ;)

    Even in your modern day shipyard, you instinctively followed that age-old tradition, yet counterintuitively decided to place the port on the "wrong" side. Might be something to consider.

    Not entirely sold on the lower rear "wingy bits", they look a bit out of place IMO, but great job overall, as usual.

    Props to the 809M7, whoever they are... :D
    The ship would look fine without the wings as well I think. I just wanted to add them so it could land if needed.

    After all, you never know what type of civilisation the original ship came from. We might need it. :D

    As for the docking. I just went with the least damaged side of the ship. So it was more in line with the wreck as it was.
     
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    I finally had some good inspiration to do some more work on the Galactic trader.
    I’m making progress again!


    Nice! Been waiting to see this ship further develop. This project shows somewhat of an evolution in the way you design interiors.

    Really liked that part where you resolved an apparently tricky building challenge by simply drawing out the walls, doors, compartments and hallways, flat on the floor, and carried on by following that.

    By the way, what rule do you follow with the placement of those fill-out motherboard blocks? Just a thought, but it might be a good idea to later on mass-replace those with stabilizer blocks, for a good stabilization buffer above 100%.
     
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    By the way, what rule do you follow with the placement of those fill-out motherboard blocks? Just a thought, but it might be a good idea to later on mass-replace those with stabilizer blocks, for a good stabilization buffer above 100%.
    The general rule I use is one block of space between walls and floors. Stabilizers would probably be best. Not sure how affordable it would make the ship though.
     
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    We really need some hostile alians to invest the creepy places on big ships.
    These type of things are so much fun!

    It's very interesting how people can be counter-instinctively placed into a pleasant, curious mood when they're exposed to environments of a sinister atmosphere... Mysterious, fishy, eerie, uninviting, bleak, dark places where it is always a likely true suspicion that we are at some sort of risk, because "something must be watching".

    I myself often go for that in my projects, and always look for that in other games, movies, and sometimes even in real life (I recommend old abandoned factories, those tend to be interesting subjects for art photography too).


    Some design choices that are conducive to this sci-fi creepy effect are very dim lighting, lots of large surrounding objects behind which something could hide, and a complex labyrinthine path leading towards the creepy area (so that one can think "If something happens and I need to run, it's a long way back to safety, and there's a chance I might get lost on the way"). You nailed all of these in this ship.

    To end with a paraphrase from Ellen Ripley: I can tell where it is... it's down there, deep in the basement, hiding in the dark, waiting for the right moment.
     
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    To end with a paraphrase from Ellen Ripley: I can tell where it is... it's down there, deep in the basement, hiding in the dark, waiting for the right moment.
    Well said. Watching some urban exploration videos can be a great source of inspiration as well. There is always a sense of mystery from abandoned structures.
     
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    Congrats for finishing that top floor, three others to go by the looks of it.

    I would suggest that maybe use flipped triangular grates instead of those rectangular grates, marked on the screenshot below. I believe triangle grates were designed to align up perfectly that way.

    As it is now, the jagged stair railings pop out and look really odd, and mess a bit with the otherwise uniformly clean style. Splendid work everywhere else (y)


    Untitled.png
     
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    Congrats for finishing that top floor, three others to go by the looks of it.

    I would suggest that maybe use flipped triangular grates instead of those rectangular grates, marked on the screenshot below. I believe triangle grates were designed to align up perfectly that way.

    As it is now, the jagged stair railings pop out and look really odd, and mess a bit with the otherwise uniformly clean style. Splendid work everywhere else (y)


    View attachment 56065

    3 more to go yes. I'm getting there.

    As for the railing. I used the rectangular ones to emphasize the stair look. I'll try them with the rectangular ones just to see how it will look.
     
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